Friday, November 14, 2008

Dannon Yogurt

11/14/08 Update: As mentioned below by a reader, it looks like Dannon now has a line of All Natural yogurt products without gelatin.

The ingredients are very simple, the Dannon Regular Plain yogurt only contains "Cultured grade A milk." The only other ingredients I see in the plain yogurts are pectin. The flavored yogurts contain sugar and flavoring as the only other ingredients.

I wonder if these cost more. My guess is they must, otherwise why don't they just make all their yogurt this way all the time?

Also, I was looking through their recipes and noticed this one where they add yogurt to guacamole. Have any of you ever done that? I wonder if it is worth doing...

From 7/25/08:
A comment was left on the post titled Egg Substitutes for Baking about gelatin and I have been looking further into the subject.

According to yourdictionary.com, gelatin is

"the tasteless, odorless, brittle mixture of proteins extracted by boiling skin, bones, horns, etc.; also, a similar vegetable substance: gelatin dissolves in hot water, forming a jellylike substance when cool, and is used in the preparation of various foods, medicine capsules, photographic film, etc."

So gelatin can be derived from either animals or vegetables.

I found an interesting file on Dannon's website explaining all of the ingredients in their yogurt. Their yogurt contains gelatin "derived from cattle hide."

Ever see the term "Kosher gelatin"? All of Dannon's yogurt has Kosher gelatin and that only means that it is not from pork. If you see Kosher gelatin in something it does not automatically mean that it is vegetarian.

click here for more details on Dannon ingredients

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

They've come out with a "natural" version that is gelatin free!!

Sarah said...

Thanks for the tip! I will post on this.

Anonymous said...

I've always put yogurt it my guacamole - it gives it a creamy texture and extra tang!

Sarah said...

Thanks! A friend of mine told me Friday night that people often add sour cream to guacamole, so that makes sense to add yogurt as a healthy alternative. I'm going to try it the next time I get my hands on some avacados...

Garren and Jayne said...

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Beatrice said...

I've tried Dannon's "All Natural" yogurt, although it was a few weeks (I tend to bounce around with my yogurt choices). I think they are selling for about $2.50 in my area, for a pack of 4 yogurts.

Sarah said...

Thanks Beatrice, do you know if it's the same price as the regular Dannon or more?

Sarah said...

Garren and Jayne,
I'm actually not familiar with this product and couldn't find the exact ingredients. So no thoughts on it...will let you if I have some later on...

Beatrice said...

I think it was a bit more expensive than the regular Dannon packs, but I don't recall the exact prices. Sorry!

Mark said...

I recently purchased a quart of Dannon all natural non-fat plain yogurt, after having also purchased a quart of their Oikos greek plain non-fat yogurt. I couldn’t help but notice the poor texture (grainy and runny) of the all natural. Then I read the ingredients list and nutrition information and I think I understand why. I discovered that while non-fat milk is the ONLY ingredient in the Oikos (but not all natural??) the “all-natural” has two-the milk and pectin. Then reading the nutrition label, I see the “all-natural” has about half of most nutritional components! 11 grams of protein vs. 22, 9 grams of carbs vs. 15, etc. Since pectin contains no protein, I have to assume the “all-natural” is almost 50% pectin (probably 49% so the milk can be listed as the first ingredient). I’m concerned about eating all those pectin “empty calories” and the amount of pectin I will be adding to my diet with this product. Why the adulteration? I say “adulteration” because pectic is cheap (read “filler”) and is normally used as a thickener, not a primary ingredient. The calories of Greek are only 20% more, BTW, @ 120 vs. 100 per cup, and the price is similar