Tuesday, August 25, 2009

Best Way to Make Ghee

8/25/09 update: See the reader's comment below. Thank you, "Anonymous!"

From 5/26/08: I have had the best success following this recipe. Ghee is a popular ingredient in Indian dishes. You can buy it in the Indian stores, but sometimes it is easier just to make it.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hallo from Munich! I learned Indian Ayurvedic cookery in India and teach it here in Germany. As I make ghee on a regular basis, I would like to add my 2 cents to this posting. Traditionally, Ghee is made with sour-cream unsalted butter (unfortunately I found that difficult to obtain in the States). As a purist, I never skim the solids off the top of my ghee but leave it to simmer until the solids have fallen to the bottom of the pan and turned slíghtly brown. This gives the Ghee a wonderful nutty flavour and less butter is wasted than by skimming. Strain through a muslin cloth (or a cotton tea strainer) into a tin and keep in your kitchen cupboard. Ghee keeps much longer if it's not refrigerated. Happy "ghee-ing"! Valerie

Sarah said...

Thank you so much for your comment! I was not aware of this. Where did you study the cooking? I am going to update my post to say that they should read your comment below. How long does it typically take you to simmer it? Yes, unfortunately we do not have sour cream butter, at least I haven't seen it.

Valerie said...

Hi Sarah, During the 80's I lived in India and was involved with the construction of Atmasantulana Village, an Ayurvedic healing Centre between Mumbai & Pune. I helped run the kitchen there and learned a lot about the wonderful cuisine of India. Ghee is considered a real healing food in Ayurveda and a must for day-to-day cooking. I usually make a batch every couple of weeks, using around 1 1/2 - 2 pounds of butter. Luckily we have easy access to organic, sour-cream, non-salted butter butter here in Germany. I start out with the flame quite high until the butter melts, then turn it down to low to keep the Ghee on a simmer. I reckon about 30 minutes, but use a kitchen timer just to make sure I don't forget! In India I learned a handy tip about cleaning out the cooking pot - when you've strained the ghee, add some water to the pot and bring it to the boil. Then strain the water into soup or use it for cooking rice or pasta. That way you kill two birds with one stone - the pot is easier to clean and the ghee water gives a lovely buttery flavour to whatever you use it for. One thing I learned in India is that hardly anything is ever wasted. I also use stainless steel containers to store my ghee (light protected). I found this article about ghee on Wikipedia which you might find interesting: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghee. It's a science in itself!
All the best to you,
Valerie
www.mccleary.de

Sarah said...

Great information. I've always wanted to go to an Ayurvedic center, maybe I can someday go to that one. Valerie, please let me know if you are ever interested in doing a guest post(s) here, either as recipes or articles. I know they say that Ayurveda can only be learned from a live teacher, but it doesn't hurt to try learning by reading when you don't have access to a live teacher...

Valerie said...

Hallo Sarah,

I certainly would love to do a guest posting - just have to pick a theme out of this vast subject! I collect eggless recipes as well so perhaps I could post some of them as a start? At the moment, I'm preparing my autumn/winter series of Ayurvedic cooking classes (beginners; Ayurvedic purification diet (2 weeks); the healing power of spices and a special menu for the holiday season). There's a link to the Healing Center I mentioned on my website so do have a look. Please also check out the vegetarian page for some eggless recipes.
Thank you for your kind offer - I'm so glad I found your great blog!
Valerie

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